Neither left nor right, but international environmentalism: Australia reflections part 8

I’m reblogging this compelling post by Jeff Ollerton, Professor of Biodiversity at the University of Northampton. I share Jeff’s immense frustration at the relentless demonisation of “The Other” that not only characterises so much of our political discourse but has come to define how we communicate with each other in general. Not everyone with whom we disagree politically is, as some would have it, a sociopath or a simpleton. It is refreshing to see that Jeff — whose politics, like my own, are very firmly left of centre — foregoes the usual “Boris is a buffoon” sloganeering to remind us that some members of Johnson’s family have strong environmentalist credentials.

As Jeff puts it so well,

“…there are plenty of historical and current examples of rapacious right-wing and left-wing governments, and also examples of such governments being highly pro-active at reducing their country’s environmental impact. The one thing that seems to me to be environmentally damaging is a rigid ideology that is followed through regardless of where it is positioned.”


 

Jeff Ollerton's Biodiversity Blog

2020-01-13 12.17.33

The NASA Earth Observatory reported this week that “explosive fire activity” has caused smoke from the Australian bushfires to enter the stratosphere and be carried half way around the world.  That smoke is currently creating hazy skies and colourful sunrises and sunsets across South America.  In the coming months the smoke will complete a full circuit and arrive back in Australia, and then continue onwards … for who knows how long?

Nothing I’ve read this week sums up better the fact that the world’s environmental challenges, including climate change, are global in scale and scope.  They therefore require global initiatives to solve.  But as I’ll argue below, equating “green” politics with the left and “anti-environmental” policies with the right is an unhelpful characterisation.

Despite the need for global action, the world’s political landscape seems to be going in the opposite direction.  Inward-looking, right-wing populism is on the rise, and governments…

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Author: Philip Moriarty

Physicist. Metal fan. Father of three. Step-dad to be. Substantially worse half to my fiancée Lori, whose patience with my Spinal Tap obsession goes to far beyond 11...

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